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We currently have five species of lemur at the Wildheart Animal Sanctuary

Lemurs are only found in Madagascar where an astonishing variety can be found, though, sadly, all species are in decline.

We are proud to demonstrate our dedication to the preservation of animal species and the education of our visitors in two main ways. Firstly by sending funds to support a charity in Madagascar (the MFG) for conservation work there and, secondly, by helping create awareness of the plight of Lemurs and the desperate need to protect the species.

Did you know…? Females are dominant in nearly all species of Lemur.

No one knows quite how many species of Lemur there are. There are lots of disagreements amongst scientists! Lemurs are not monkeys, although they do share a common ancestor. Lemurs are classed as prosimians.

If you love Lemurs, why not enjoy their company up close by visiting our state of the art Lemur Dome?

Walkthrough Dome

Earl

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Black & White Ruffed Lemur

Earl joined our family from Paradise Wildlife Park in the summer of 2018. Earl loves attention through the fence from his human carers and is the more dominant of our two males.

Darnell

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Black & White Ruffed Lemur

Darnell came to us in the summer of 2018 from Paradise Wildlife Park. Darnell is the lower ranking of our two males and is definitely the more laid-back of the two boys.

Michelle

Conservation Status: Endangered

Species: Ring-tailed Lemur

Michelle arrived at the Wildheart Animal Sanctuary from Chester Zoo when she was about a year old and is the group’s dominant female. This summer, Michelle has asserted her authority with lemurs and humans alike!

Tsingy

Conservation Status: Endangered

Species: Ring-tailed Lemur

Tsingy was born at the Wildheart Animal Sanctuary and was raised by his mother. He is named after the spiky rock formation which occurs within the ring-tailed lemur’s range and the word Tsingy means “to tiptoe”. He is brother to Zebedee and is the lowest ranking of the group. Every year he receives a birthday card from one of his biggest fans, Dame Judi Dench.

Zebedee

Conservation Status: Endangered

Species: Ring-tailed Lemur

Zebedee was born at the Wildheart Animal Sanctuary and raised by his mother. As his name might suggest, Zebedee is a bouncy individual and enjoys interacting with his human carers. He is the older brother to Tsingy.

Catherine

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Mongoose Lemur

Born elsewhere in the UK, Catherine came to us from Linton Zoo in 2006. She used to be on the breeding program with McLovin but when he retired, she seemed more than happy with his replacement, cute little Bjork who was also sent from Linton Zoo.

Bjork

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Mongoose Lemur

Bjork is a cheeky little chappy. Somewhat of a scaredy cat, he is respectful to Catherine and patiently waits his turn for food.

Small Dome

Mangoky

Conservation Status: Endangered

Species: Ring-tailed Lemur

Mangoky is the grand-daughter of Michelle. Rejected at birth by her mother, Mangoky was hand-reared by the dedicated staff of the primate section, and as a result, has never come to grasp lemur rules of socialization. Mangoky therefore spends her time apart from the main family group as sole companion to male Suarez and these two are, happily, a match made in heaven!

Suarez

Conservation Status: Endangered

Species: Ring-tailed Lemur

Suarez came to us in 2011 from Chessington Zoo. He makes the perfect partner for mercurial Mangoky as he is good at doing what he’s told most of the time! But can stand his ground if necessary!

Bonnie

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Red-ruffed Lemur

Bonnie was born at Paignton Zoo and came to us in 2011. Our Animal Carers say she is the most lemur like of all our lemurs here at the Sanctuary, as she will fiercely defend her territory!

Mitsio

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Species: Black Lemur

Mitsio came to us in 2009 from a Zoological Park in France. He has successfully bred two daughters here at the sanctuary. He is a stunningly beautiful and graceful boy who often chooses to allow his favorite humans to give him a little tickle on the top of his head through the habitat mesh.

Antaly & Kintana

orange eye'd lemur

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Species: Black Lemur

Antaly came along first in 2011 and Kintana (whose name means ‘star’) followed two years later. Unusually, these two females assume joint responsibility for dominance and are affectionately referred to as the ‘tag team’, as they take it in turns to call the shots.

McLovin

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered

Species: Mongoose Lemur

McLovin sadly passed away on 4th April 2023. We suspect he may have been one of the oldest lemurs at what we estimate to be 40 years old. He had the most adorable, huge amber eyes and was incredibly precious to us. Wildborn and captured illegally, McLovin is originally a victim of the pet trade by a Polish sailor. He came to join the breeding program here at the Wildheart Animal Sanctuary in 2009 from Paradise Wildlife Park via a number of European zoos. Although older than any of the other lemurs, he certainly had the character to ward off any human he disliked!
McLovin is an icon of the Sanctuary and the sorely missed by all those who knew and loved him.